Patient Education


Elk Grove Dermatology, S.C. would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Elk Grove Dermatology, S.C. provides a full range of medical services including the following:

Accutane Treatment

Acne can be unsightly and painful. In addition to taking a physical toll, it can result in poor self-esteem and, even, depression. Accutane capsules, with an active ingredient of isotretinoin, are a potent, highly effective option for clearing even the most stubborn acne. For more than 20 years, Accutane therapy has successfully treated severe nodular acne. The small Accutane capsules are taken orally, in several courses of 4 to 6 months each. ...


Read More...


Acne

Acne is a common condition that causes blocked pores, pimples, cysts and other lesions on the skin of the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and upper arms. Although teenagers are often affected, adults of any age can suffer from acne. Acne is not life-threatening, but can lead to physical disfigurement and emotional distress. There are several effective treatment methods that improve the skin's appearance and prevent future breakouts. ...


Read More...


Actinic Keratosis

An actinic keratosis, also known as a solar keratosis, is a common premalignant skin lesion. An actinic keratosis occurs when the cells that comprise 90 percent of the epidermis, the keratinocytes, change their size, shape or organization in a process called cutaneous dysplasia.This alters the texture of the skin surface and may extend deeper, into the dermis. ...


Read More...


Age Spots

Age spots, also known as brown spots, liver spots and solar lentigines, are a common sign of aging. Flat, oval areas of pigmentation, age spots tend to appear on parts of the body, such as the face, hands, arms, shoulders and feet, that are exposed to the sun. Most common in people older than 40, they can be freckle-sized or more than a half-inch in length, and range in color from light brown to black. When age spots are grouped together, they appear even larger. ...


Read More...


Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata, commonly known as alopecia, is an autoimmune disease that results in hair loss. Alopecia is caused when the body's immune system attacks the cells in hair follicles, because it mistakenly perceives them as invaders. In most cases, hair falls out in only a few small, round patches but, in some cases, alopecia causes a total loss of hair on the scalp (alopecia areata totalis) or a complete loss of hair everywhere on the body (alopecia areata universalis). ...


Read More...


Biopsy of Skin Lesions

A skin lesion biopsy is a diagnostic test that involves removing a tissue sample and examining it under a microscope. This test is used to identify suspicious lesions and to differentiate normal cells from abnormal ones.

Reasons for Skin Lesion Biopsies

Skin lesion biopsies are performed when simple visual examination by the physician is insufficient to make a clearcut diagnosis. Such biopsies are done in order to make a definitive diagnosis of: ...


Read More...

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis is a skin condition caused by an allergic reaction to certain materials that come into contact with the skin. A common cause of rashes, contact dermatitis appears on the skin after contact with the offending material or substance has taken place. It may occur immediately after contact or may take several days to appear. Typically, contact dermatitis presents as a red, itchy rash. While not serious medically, the condition may be very uncomfortable. ...


Read More...


Eczema

Eczema is a common skin disorder that manifests itself as itchy skin and a red rash; it is particularly common in infants and young children. Eczema most often develops as a result of an allergic reaction, or an immune-system malfunction. It can cause irritation and inflammation anywhere on the body, but is especially prevalent on the face, the insides of the arms, and behind the knees. In infants with eczema, the scalp is frequently affected. ...


Read More...


Skin Tags

A skin tag (acrochordon) is a small, soft piece of flesh-colored or dark tissue that is attached to the surface of the skin by a connecting "stalk." Most skin tags develop over time, although some people are born with them. Skin tags typically affect people who are overweight, have diabetes, or are older than 40. ...


Read More...


Folliculitis

Folliculitis is the inflammation of hair follicles, resulting from small skin abscesses, that can occur anywhere on the skin. The cause of most cases of folliculitis is the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus which enters the body through tiny breaks in the skin, such as those caused by friction with clothing, shaving too closely, or insect bites. ...


Read More...


Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is a condition that causes excessive sweating on the hands, feet, armpits, face and genital area, or all over the entire body. The exact cause of this condition is unknown, although it often runs in families and begins during childhood.

Patients with hyperhidrosis may sweat all over their body or in certain areas. Their skin may become white and wrinkled or red and irritated as a result of the constant moisture, and it may develop an odor as well. Living with hyperhidrosis often causes patients to feel embarrassed, awkward and self-conscious, especially during social situations. ...


Read More...


Impetigo

Impetigo is a contagious bacterial skin infection frequently occurring in infants and young children. It is almost always caused by one of two types of bacteria: staphylococcus (staph) or streptococcus. Impetigo usually develops where the skin surface is compromised, enabling bacteria to invade. This may occur where the skin has a cut, scratch, bite or itchy rash. Impetigo often occurs at the end of a cold, when the skin around the nose or mouth is sore. The first signs of impetigo are the appearance of small itchy pimple-like sores. They may appear anywhere on the body, but most frequently occur on the face, arms, or legs. The sores eventually fill with honey-colored pus, break open after a few days and form a yellowish crust. The itchy sores can be spread by scratching to other parts of the body or from one person to another. ...


Read More...


Keloids

A keloid is an overgrown area of scar tissue that forms at the site of a previous injury such as an incision, wound, vaccination, acne or piercing. An irregularly shaped pink or red scar that is raised above the rest of the skin, a keloid may grow into areas that were not affected by the initial injury. A keloid is generally painless, but may feel itchy or be sensitive to the touch. ...


Read More...


Keratosis Pilaris

Keratosis pilaris is a benign skin disorder involving a blockage of the hair follicles by keratin, a protein that protects the skin from infection. When the condition occurs, a scaly plug forms, blocking the opening at the end of the hair follicle. In most instances, many plugs form at the same time, creating patches of rough, bumpy skin. Typically, keratosis pilaris appears on the upper arms, thighs, cheeks and buttocks. When evident on the face, it is sometimes mistaken for acne. ...


Read More...


Lichen Planus

Lichen planus is a condition that causes a bumpy rash to develop on the skin. The rash typically forms on the wrists, back, legs, torso or genitals, but may occur anywhere. Lesions or sores may also develop in the mouth. Lichen planus is not a contagious condition and it often affects middle-aged adults but rarely occurs in children. ...


Read More...


Melanoma

Melanoma is a potentially life-threatening skin cancer of the melanocytes, the cells that make melanin (brown pigment). Melanoma's fatality rate is higher than that of basal cell and squamous cell cancers; it accounts for more than 80 percent of all skin-cancer deaths. Early detection and treatment greatly increase the likelihood of cure. Performing a self-examination in front of a mirror is the best way to detect melanoma in its early stages. If melanoma is suspected, a doctor should be contacted immediately. ...


Read More...


Melasma

Melasma is a common skin condition in which patches of skin on the face darken. Typically, the affected areas are the cheeks, bridge of the nose, forehead or upper lip. The dark patches are often symmetrical. Melasma can occur in anyone, but is much more frequently found among women, especially women who are pregnant when it is called chloasma, and is sometimes referred to as the "pregnancy mask." Although not a painful or dangerous problem, melasma can be very distressing emotionally because of its alteration of the appearance. Melasma is not always a permanent condition. It may disappear in a woman several months after she gives birth, but may reoccur after unprotected exposure to the sun. ...


Read More...


Moles and Birthmarks

Moles are growths on the skin that are usually brown or black; they may be located, alone or in groups, anywhere on the body. A birthmark is a colored mark that appears soon after a baby's birth. Although many moles and birthmarks are completely benign and pose no health risk, some people choose to remove them because they consider them unattractive. Regularly using a strong sunscreen, and monitoring birthmarks and moles for changes, is highly recommended. ...


Read More...


Molluscum Contagiosum Virus

Molluscum contagiosum virus, also known as MCV, is a viral skin infection, that causes small painless bumps on the skin. Skin bumps usually appear anywhere on the body two to seven weeks after exposure to infection, although in some patients it may take up to six months before symptoms are present. While it is more common in children, MCV can affect adults with a compromised immune system. Adults affected with MCV in the genital area are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease. MCV can be spread through vaginal, anal or oral sex as a result of skin contact with an infected area. ...


Read More...


Onychomycosis

Onychomycosis (nail fungus) is the most common infection of the nails in adults; it affects toenails more frequently than fingernails. Usually, the first sign of onychomycosis is a white or yellow spot under the nail. Left untreated, onychomycosis causes a nail to thicken and become brittle. The nail may split or crumble, or even separate from the nail bed. Onychomycosis can be contagious, spreading from nail to nail or, rarely, to nearby skin. ...


Read More...


Pilonidal Cyst Removal

A pilonidal cyst is a fluid-filled, pimple-like sac at the coccyx (tailbone), just below the crack of the buttocks. Pilonidal cysts are prone to infection; if one does become infected, filling with pus, it is technically called a "pilonidal abscess." Pilonidal abscesses are always treated with excision and drainage because, left untreated, the infection can spread. ...


Read More...


Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are noncancerous growths that develop on the soles of the feet. Caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), plantar warts are frequently found on the heels or balls of the feet, areas to which the most pressure is applied during standing or walking. While plantar warts are not a serious health threat, they may cause pain or tenderness and therefore need to be removed. ...


Read More...


Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common, chronic skin condition. The result of a rapid buildup of skin cells, psoriasis causes red, raised, dry and cracked scaly patches, and even blisters, to form on the skin. In some cases, psoriasis affects the fingernails, causing yellowing and small depressions. Psoriasis can be mild, moderate or severe, and, in most cases, causes itching and burning in affected areas or skin. ...


Read More...


Ringworm

Ringworm is a contagious infection of the skin caused by a fungus called tinea, not a worm as one might infer from its name. Ringworm presents as itchy, scaly, ring-shaped red patches on the skin, bald spots in the hair or beard, or discolored, thickened nails. The most commonly infected areas of skin are on the scalp (tinea capitis), beard (tinea barbae), body (tinea corporis), groin (tinea cruris, jock itch or diaper rash) or foot (tinea pedis or athlete's foot). Ringworm tends to occur in warm, moist areas of the body, and can be passed by touching the skin of an infected person or by making contact with an contaminated item, such as a towel, hairbrush, or pool or shower surface. Pets, especially cats, can also transmit the fungus. Skin that is wet from sweat or the environment, or that is compromised by a minor injury, is more susceptible to an invasion of ringworm fungus. ...


Read More...


Rosacea

Rosacea is a common, chronic skin condition that affects up to 10 percent of the population, although many people are unaware that they have it. It usually affects the face, causing redness and the formation of small, pus-filled bumps similar to acne, and, like other skin conditions, can cause emotional distress for the sufferer. Rosacea typically affects fair-skinned women between 30 and 60 years of age. It can first appear during menopause, and is more prevalent in people with a family history of the condition. Although rosacea is a chronic condition that cannot be cured, there are several treatments available to relieve its symptoms and prevent flareups. ...


Read More...


Rhinophyma

Rhinophyma is a severe form of rosacea that can significantly distort the appearance of the nose. Although the cause of rhinophyma is unknown, this condition occurs most commonly in men older than 40. Rhinophyma was once thought to be the result of excessive alcohol consumption, but research has proven this to be untrue. Rhinophyma is usually diagnosed by visual examination, but on occasion a biopsy may be performed. ...


Read More...


Scabies

Scabies is a skin condition caused by a mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) that burrows into the skin, causing itchiness in the affected area. The itching is the result of the body's allergic reaction to the mite, its eggs and its waste products.

This condition is highly contagious, spreading quickly through physical contact, and contact with personal belongings such as sheets and towels. Because of the contagion factor, an entire family or contact area (a classroom or a section of a nursing home) is often treated to prevent recontamination. Scabies can affect anyone, and at any age. Cleanliness, or lack of it, is not a factor in its transmission. ...


Read More...


Seborrheic Keratoses

Seborrheic keratoses are noncancerous skin growths that commonly affect individuals over 50 years of age. While the exact cause of these growths are not known, they do tend to be hereditary. Because of the areas in which they commonly appear, there is some suspicion that ultraviolet light may be a causative factor in their development. ...


Read More...


Shingles

Shingles is a disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus, the herpes virus responsible for chickenpox. Once an individual has been infected with chickenpox, this virus lies dormant within the body's nerve tissue. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles, often after another illness or during a period of great stress. Advancing age and immune deficiency disorders are also risk factors for shingles. Shingles most commonly presents as a painful rash of fluid-filled blisters wrapping around the back and chest, typically affecting only one side of the body. It is possible, however, for patients to have shingles with only a very mild rash or even no rash at all. Early treatment for shingles may minimize symptoms and prevent complications.

...


Read More...


Skin Cancer

Skin cancer, which is the most common form of cancer in the United States, is the result of the abnormal growth of skin cells. Cancer can affect skin anywhere on the body, but most frequently appears on skin that is exposed to the sun. There are more than a million new cases of skin cancer in the United States each year. Although most cases of skin cancer can be successfully treated, it is still important to keep skin safe and healthy and try to prevent this disease. ...


Read More...


Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a skin condition caused by progressive depigmentation; it presents as white patches on the skin. Although any part of the body can be affected, vitiligo is usually found on the face, elbows, knees, hands, feet, genitals and upper thighs. When the scalp is affected, the hair growing on the vitiligo patch is white. Vitiligo can also affect the chin or eyelid, in which case the lashes or beard become white. The texture of the depigmented skin is not altered and the condition is not painful, although the affected skin may be much more sensitive to the sun. ...


Read More...


Warts

Warts are a common skin condition resulting from infection by one or another strain of human papillomavirus (HPV). There are several types of warts that can affect individuals of any age, but some types are more commonly found in children and some more often found in adults. Many types of warts, especially those usually found on children, disappear on their own. When troublesome, warts can be treated with medications or otherwise removed. ...


Read More...


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Accutane Treatment


Acne can be unsightly and painful. In addition to taking a physical toll, it can result in poor self-esteem and, even, depression. Accutane capsules, with an active ingredient of isotretinoin, are a potent, highly effective option for clearing even the most stubborn acne. For more than 20 years, Accutane therapy has successfully treated severe nodular acne. The small Accutane capsules are taken orally, in several courses of 4 to 6 months each. ...


Read More...

Acne


Acne is a common condition that causes blocked pores, pimples, cysts and other lesions on the skin of the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and upper arms. Although teenagers are often affected, adults of any age can suffer from acne. Acne is not life-threatening, but can lead to physical disfigurement and emotional distress. There are several effective treatment methods that improve the skin's appearance and prevent future breakouts. ...


Read More...

Actinic Keratosis


An actinic keratosis, also known as a solar keratosis, is a common premalignant skin lesion. An actinic keratosis occurs when the cells that comprise 90 percent of the epidermis, the keratinocytes, change their size, shape or organization in a process called cutaneous dysplasia.This alters the texture of the skin surface and may extend deeper, into the dermis. ...


Read More...

Age Spots


Age spots, also known as brown spots, liver spots and solar lentigines, are a common sign of aging. Flat, oval areas of pigmentation, age spots tend to appear on parts of the body, such as the face, hands, arms, shoulders and feet, that are exposed to the sun. Most common in people older than 40, they can be freckle-sized or more than a half-inch in length, and range in color from light brown to black. When age spots are grouped together, they appear even larger. ...


Read More...

Alopecia Areata


Alopecia areata, commonly known as alopecia, is an autoimmune disease that results in hair loss. Alopecia is caused when the body's immune system attacks the cells in hair follicles, because it mistakenly perceives them as invaders. In most cases, hair falls out in only a few small, round patches but, in some cases, alopecia causes a total loss of hair on the scalp (alopecia areata totalis) or a complete loss of hair everywhere on the body (alopecia areata universalis). ...


Read More...

Biopsy of Skin Lesions


A skin lesion biopsy is a diagnostic test that involves removing a tissue sample and examining it under a microscope. This test is used to identify suspicious lesions and to differentiate normal cells from abnormal ones.

Reasons for Skin Lesion Biopsies

Skin lesion biopsies are performed when simple visual examination by the physician is insufficient to make a clearcut diagnosis. Such biopsies are done in order to make a definitive diagnosis of: ...


Read More...

Chemical Peels


Chemical peels remove damaged outer layers of skin to make skin smoother, reduce scarring and remove blemishes. Ranging from mild to strong, there are three types of chemical peels: alphahydroxy acid (AHA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and phenol. The strength of each peel is tailored to the patient. Peels can be combined with other procedures, such as facelifts, for additional improvement to skin. Chemical peels may be covered by insurance if they are performed for medical rather than cosmetic reasons. ...


Read More...

Contact Dermatitis


Contact dermatitis is a skin condition caused by an allergic reaction to certain materials that come into contact with the skin. A common cause of rashes, contact dermatitis appears on the skin after contact with the offending material or substance has taken place. It may occur immediately after contact or may take several days to appear. Typically, contact dermatitis presents as a red, itchy rash. While not serious medically, the condition may be very uncomfortable. ...


Read More...

Eczema


Eczema is a common skin disorder that manifests itself as itchy skin and a red rash; it is particularly common in infants and young children. Eczema most often develops as a result of an allergic reaction, or an immune-system malfunction. It can cause irritation and inflammation anywhere on the body, but is especially prevalent on the face, the insides of the arms, and behind the knees. In infants with eczema, the scalp is frequently affected. ...


Read More...

Folliculitis


Folliculitis is the inflammation of hair follicles, resulting from small skin abscesses, that can occur anywhere on the skin. The cause of most cases of folliculitis is the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus which enters the body through tiny breaks in the skin, such as those caused by friction with clothing, shaving too closely, or insect bites. ...


Read More...

Hyperhidrosis


Hyperhidrosis is a condition that causes excessive sweating on the hands, feet, armpits, face and genital area, or all over the entire body. The exact cause of this condition is unknown, although it often runs in families and begins during childhood.

Patients with hyperhidrosis may sweat all over their body or in certain areas. Their skin may become white and wrinkled or red and irritated as a result of the constant moisture, and it may develop an odor as well. Living with hyperhidrosis often causes patients to feel embarrassed, awkward and self-conscious, especially during social situations. ...


Read More...

Impetigo


Impetigo is a contagious bacterial skin infection frequently occurring in infants and young children. It is almost always caused by one of two types of bacteria: staphylococcus (staph) or streptococcus. Impetigo usually develops where the skin surface is compromised, enabling bacteria to invade. This may occur where the skin has a cut, scratch, bite or itchy rash. Impetigo often occurs at the end of a cold, when the skin around the nose or mouth is sore. The first signs of impetigo are the appearance of small itchy pimple-like sores. They may appear anywhere on the body, but most frequently occur on the face, arms, or legs. The sores eventually fill with honey-colored pus, break open after a few days and form a yellowish crust. The itchy sores can be spread by scratching to other parts of the body or from one person to another. ...


Read More...

Keloids


A keloid is an overgrown area of scar tissue that forms at the site of a previous injury such as an incision, wound, vaccination, acne or piercing. An irregularly shaped pink or red scar that is raised above the rest of the skin, a keloid may grow into areas that were not affected by the initial injury. A keloid is generally painless, but may feel itchy or be sensitive to the touch. ...


Read More...

Keratosis Pilaris


Keratosis pilaris is a benign skin disorder involving a blockage of the hair follicles by keratin, a protein that protects the skin from infection. When the condition occurs, a scaly plug forms, blocking the opening at the end of the hair follicle. In most instances, many plugs form at the same time, creating patches of rough, bumpy skin. Typically, keratosis pilaris appears on the upper arms, thighs, cheeks and buttocks. When evident on the face, it is sometimes mistaken for acne. ...


Read More...

Lichen Planus


Lichen planus is a condition that causes a bumpy rash to develop on the skin. The rash typically forms on the wrists, back, legs, torso or genitals, but may occur anywhere. Lesions or sores may also develop in the mouth. Lichen planus is not a contagious condition and it often affects middle-aged adults but rarely occurs in children. ...


Read More...

Melanoma


Melanoma is a potentially life-threatening skin cancer of the melanocytes, the cells that make melanin (brown pigment). Melanoma's fatality rate is higher than that of basal cell and squamous cell cancers; it accounts for more than 80 percent of all skin-cancer deaths. Early detection and treatment greatly increase the likelihood of cure. Performing a self-examination in front of a mirror is the best way to detect melanoma in its early stages. If melanoma is suspected, a doctor should be contacted immediately. ...


Read More...

Melasma


Melasma is a common skin condition in which patches of skin on the face darken. Typically, the affected areas are the cheeks, bridge of the nose, forehead or upper lip. The dark patches are often symmetrical. Melasma can occur in anyone, but is much more frequently found among women, especially women who are pregnant when it is called chloasma, and is sometimes referred to as the "pregnancy mask." Although not a painful or dangerous problem, melasma can be very distressing emotionally because of its alteration of the appearance. Melasma is not always a permanent condition. It may disappear in a woman several months after she gives birth, but may reoccur after unprotected exposure to the sun. ...


Read More...

Moles and Birthmarks


Moles are growths on the skin that are usually brown or black; they may be located, alone or in groups, anywhere on the body. A birthmark is a colored mark that appears soon after a baby's birth. Although many moles and birthmarks are completely benign and pose no health risk, some people choose to remove them because they consider them unattractive. Regularly using a strong sunscreen, and monitoring birthmarks and moles for changes, is highly recommended. ...


Read More...

Molluscum Contagiosum Virus


Molluscum contagiosum virus, also known as MCV, is a viral skin infection, that causes small painless bumps on the skin. Skin bumps usually appear anywhere on the body two to seven weeks after exposure to infection, although in some patients it may take up to six months before symptoms are present. While it is more common in children, MCV can affect adults with a compromised immune system. Adults affected with MCV in the genital area are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease. MCV can be spread through vaginal, anal or oral sex as a result of skin contact with an infected area. ...


Read More...

Onychomycosis


Onychomycosis (nail fungus) is the most common infection of the nails in adults; it affects toenails more frequently than fingernails. Usually, the first sign of onychomycosis is a white or yellow spot under the nail. Left untreated, onychomycosis causes a nail to thicken and become brittle. The nail may split or crumble, or even separate from the nail bed. Onychomycosis can be contagious, spreading from nail to nail or, rarely, to nearby skin. ...


Read More...

Pilonidal Cyst Removal


A pilonidal cyst is a fluid-filled, pimple-like sac at the coccyx (tailbone), just below the crack of the buttocks. Pilonidal cysts are prone to infection; if one does become infected, filling with pus, it is technically called a "pilonidal abscess." Pilonidal abscesses are always treated with excision and drainage because, left untreated, the infection can spread. ...


Read More...

Plantar Warts


Plantar warts are noncancerous growths that develop on the soles of the feet. Caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), plantar warts are frequently found on the heels or balls of the feet, areas to which the most pressure is applied during standing or walking. While plantar warts are not a serious health threat, they may cause pain or tenderness and therefore need to be removed. ...


Read More...

Psoriasis


Psoriasis is a common, chronic skin condition. The result of a rapid buildup of skin cells, psoriasis causes red, raised, dry and cracked scaly patches, and even blisters, to form on the skin. In some cases, psoriasis affects the fingernails, causing yellowing and small depressions. Psoriasis can be mild, moderate or severe, and, in most cases, causes itching and burning in affected areas or skin. ...


Read More...

Ringworm


Ringworm is a contagious infection of the skin caused by a fungus called tinea, not a worm as one might infer from its name. Ringworm presents as itchy, scaly, ring-shaped red patches on the skin, bald spots in the hair or beard, or discolored, thickened nails. The most commonly infected areas of skin are on the scalp (tinea capitis), beard (tinea barbae), body (tinea corporis), groin (tinea cruris, jock itch or diaper rash) or foot (tinea pedis or athlete's foot). Ringworm tends to occur in warm, moist areas of the body, and can be passed by touching the skin of an infected person or by making contact with an contaminated item, such as a towel, hairbrush, or pool or shower surface. Pets, especially cats, can also transmit the fungus. Skin that is wet from sweat or the environment, or that is compromised by a minor injury, is more susceptible to an invasion of ringworm fungus. ...


Read More...

Rosacea


Rosacea is a common, chronic skin condition that affects up to 10 percent of the population, although many people are unaware that they have it. It usually affects the face, causing redness and the formation of small, pus-filled bumps similar to acne, and, like other skin conditions, can cause emotional distress for the sufferer. Rosacea typically affects fair-skinned women between 30 and 60 years of age. It can first appear during menopause, and is more prevalent in people with a family history of the condition. Although rosacea is a chronic condition that cannot be cured, there are several treatments available to relieve its symptoms and prevent flareups. ...


Read More...

Rhinophyma


Rhinophyma is a severe form of rosacea that can significantly distort the appearance of the nose. Although the cause of rhinophyma is unknown, this condition occurs most commonly in men older than 40. Rhinophyma was once thought to be the result of excessive alcohol consumption, but research has proven this to be untrue. Rhinophyma is usually diagnosed by visual examination, but on occasion a biopsy may be performed. ...


Read More...

Scabies


Scabies is a skin condition caused by a mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) that burrows into the skin, causing itchiness in the affected area. The itching is the result of the body's allergic reaction to the mite, its eggs and its waste products.

This condition is highly contagious, spreading quickly through physical contact, and contact with personal belongings such as sheets and towels. Because of the contagion factor, an entire family or contact area (a classroom or a section of a nursing home) is often treated to prevent recontamination. Scabies can affect anyone, and at any age. Cleanliness, or lack of it, is not a factor in its transmission. ...


Read More...

Seborrheic Keratoses


Seborrheic keratoses are noncancerous skin growths that commonly affect individuals over 50 years of age. While the exact cause of these growths are not known, they do tend to be hereditary. Because of the areas in which they commonly appear, there is some suspicion that ultraviolet light may be a causative factor in their development. ...


Read More...

Shingles


Shingles is a disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus, the herpes virus responsible for chickenpox. Once an individual has been infected with chickenpox, this virus lies dormant within the body's nerve tissue. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles, often after another illness or during a period of great stress. Advancing age and immune deficiency disorders are also risk factors for shingles. Shingles most commonly presents as a painful rash of fluid-filled blisters wrapping around the back and chest, typically affecting only one side of the body. It is possible, however, for patients to have shingles with only a very mild rash or even no rash at all. Early treatment for shingles may minimize symptoms and prevent complications.
...


Read More...

Skin Cancer


Skin cancer, which is the most common form of cancer in the United States, is the result of the abnormal growth of skin cells. Cancer can affect skin anywhere on the body, but most frequently appears on skin that is exposed to the sun. There are more than a million new cases of skin cancer in the United States each year. Although most cases of skin cancer can be successfully treated, it is still important to keep skin safe and healthy and try to prevent this disease. ...


Read More...

Skin Tags


A skin tag (acrochordon) is a small, soft piece of flesh-colored or dark tissue that is attached to the surface of the skin by a connecting "stalk." Most skin tags develop over time, although some people are born with them. Skin tags typically affect people who are overweight, have diabetes, or are older than 40. ...


Read More...

Vitiligo


Vitiligo is a skin condition caused by progressive depigmentation; it presents as white patches on the skin. Although any part of the body can be affected, vitiligo is usually found on the face, elbows, knees, hands, feet, genitals and upper thighs. When the scalp is affected, the hair growing on the vitiligo patch is white. Vitiligo can also affect the chin or eyelid, in which case the lashes or beard become white. The texture of the depigmented skin is not altered and the condition is not painful, although the affected skin may be much more sensitive to the sun. ...


Read More...

Warts


Warts are a common skin condition resulting from infection by one or another strain of human papillomavirus (HPV). There are several types of warts that can affect individuals of any age, but some types are more commonly found in children and some more often found in adults. Many types of warts, especially those usually found on children, disappear on their own. When troublesome, warts can be treated with medications or otherwise removed. ...


Read More...


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